CIO Retail Summit Europe | October 11, 2017 | London, UK

↓ Agenda Key

Keynote Presentation

Visionary speaker presents to entire audience on key issues, challenges and business opportunities

Keynote Presentations give attending delegates the opportunity to hear from leading voices in the industry. These presentations feature relevant topics and issues aligned with the speaker's experience and expertise, selected by the speaker in concert with the summit's Content Committee." title="Keynote Presentations give attending delegates the opportunity to hear from leading voices in the industry. These presentations feature relevant topics and issues aligned with the speaker's experience and expertise, selected by the speaker in concert with the summit's Content Committee.

Executive Visions

Panel moderated by Master of Ceremonies and headed by four executives discussing critical business topics

Executive Visions sessions are panel discussions that enable in-depth exchanges on critical business topics. Led by a moderator, these sessions encourage attending executives to address industry challenges and gain insight through interaction with expert panel members." title="Executive Visions sessions are panel discussions that enable in-depth exchanges on critical business topics. Led by a moderator, these sessions encourage attending executives to address industry challenges and gain insight through interaction with expert panel members.

Thought Leadership

Solution provider-led session giving high-level overview of opportunities

Led by an executive from the vendor community, Thought Leadership sessions provide comprehensive overviews of current business concerns, offering strategies and solutions for success. This is a unique opportunity to access the perspective of a leading member of the vendor community." title="Led by an executive from the vendor community, Thought Leadership sessions provide comprehensive overviews of current business concerns, offering strategies and solutions for success. This is a unique opportunity to access the perspective of a leading member of the vendor community.

Think Tank

End user-led session in boardroom style, focusing on best practices

Think Tanks are interactive sessions that place delegates in lively discussion and debate. Sessions admit only 15-20 participants at a time to ensure an intimate environment in which delegates can engage each other and have their voices heard." title="Think Tanks are interactive sessions that place delegates in lively discussion and debate. Sessions admit only 15-20 participants at a time to ensure an intimate environment in which delegates can engage each other and have their voices heard.

Roundtable

Interactive session led by a moderator, focused on industry issue

Led by an industry analyst, expert or a member of the vendor community, Roundtables are open-forum sessions with strategic guidance. Attending delegates gather to collaborate on common issues and challenges within a format that allows them to get things done." title="Led by an industry analyst, expert or a member of the vendor community, Roundtables are open-forum sessions with strategic guidance. Attending delegates gather to collaborate on common issues and challenges within a format that allows them to get things done.

Case Study

Overview of recent project successes and failures

Case Studies allow attending executives to hear compelling stories about implementations and projects, emphasizing best practices and lessons learned. Presentations are immediately followed by Q&A sessions." title="Case Studies allow attending executives to hear compelling stories about implementations and projects, emphasizing best practices and lessons learned. Presentations are immediately followed by Q&A sessions.

Focus Group

Discussion of business drivers within a particular industry area

Focus Groups allow executives to discuss business drivers within particular industry areas. These sessions allow attendees to isolate specific issues and work through them. Presentations last 15-20 minutes and are followed by Q&A sessions." title="Focus Groups allow executives to discuss business drivers within particular industry areas. These sessions allow attendees to isolate specific issues and work through them. Presentations last 15-20 minutes and are followed by Q&A sessions.

Analyst Q&A Session

Moderator-led coverage of the latest industry research

Q&A sessions cover the latest industry research, allowing attendees to gain insight on topics of interest through questions directed to a leading industry analyst." title="Q&A sessions cover the latest industry research, allowing attendees to gain insight on topics of interest through questions directed to a leading industry analyst.

Vendor Showcase

Several brief, pointed overviews of the newest solutions and services

Taking the form of three 10-minute elevator pitches by attending vendors, these sessions provide a concise and pointed overview of the latest solutions and services aligned with attendee needs and preferences." title="Taking the form of three 10-minute elevator pitches by attending vendors, these sessions provide a concise and pointed overview of the latest solutions and services aligned with attendee needs and preferences.

Executive Exchange

Pre-determined, one-on-one interaction revolving around solutions of interest

Executive Exchanges offer one-on-one interaction between executives and vendors. This is an opportunity for both parties to make key business contacts, ask direct questions and get the answers they need. Session content is prearranged and based on mutual interest." title="Executive Exchanges offer one-on-one interaction between executives and vendors. This is an opportunity for both parties to make key business contacts, ask direct questions and get the answers they need. Session content is prearranged and based on mutual interest.

Open Forum Luncheon

Informal discussions on pre-determined topics

Led by a moderator, Open Forum Luncheons offer attendees informal, yet focused discussions on current industry topics and trends over lunch." title="Led by a moderator, Open Forum Luncheons offer attendees informal, yet focused discussions on current industry topics and trends over lunch.

Networking Session

Unique activities at once relaxing, enjoyable and productive

Networking opportunities take various unique forms, merging enjoyable and relaxing activities with an environment conducive to in-depth conversation. These gatherings allow attendees to wind down between sessions and one-on-one meetings, while still furthering discussions and being productive." title="Networking opportunities take various unique forms, merging enjoyable and relaxing activities with an environment conducive to in-depth conversation. These gatherings allow attendees to wind down between sessions and one-on-one meetings, while still furthering discussions and being productive.

 

Wednesday, October 11, 2017 - CIO Retail Summit Europe

7:00 am - 7:55 am

Registration and Networking Breakfast

 

8:00 am - 8:10 am

Welcome Address and Opening Remarks

 

8:10 am - 8:40 am

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Keynote Presentation

Moving from Operations to Transformations

The accepted number for the amount of the IT budget that is tied up in operational spend, in paying to maintain technology that has already been purchased, is 80% leaving only 20% for the IT department to use to drive new projects. Because this level of funding is so low, as much as 70% of IT sponsored projects fail. Yet IT departments are being constantly pushed to be innovative, to find a way to embrace new technologies and leverage them to drive business change. How can you do that when your time, money, and effort goes to just keeping the lights on? Join us as we collectively explore this issue and examine some of the successful strategies that are being leveraged by top IT leaders.

Takeaways:

  • The pressure on CIO’s to drive change has never been higher, but fortunately neither has the opportunity to do so
  • Disruptive technologies don’t just have the power to disrupt IT for the worse, they have the power to disrupt the business for the better
  • Fortune favors the bold; now is the time to take a leap into new modes of business to break the operational spend stranglehold
 

8:45 am - 9:15 am

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Keynote Presentation

Becoming A Service-Oriented Enterprise

Many organizations are discovering that adopting service catalogues, curated collections of business and IT services, can both enhance IT-business relationships (by clearly outlining capabilities and expectations as well service costs) and improve operational competency (by standardizing service offerings). Service catalogues are only as useful as their accuracy however and a service catalogue with service levels that cannot be met can in many have a greater negative impact than not having a service catalogue at all. To ensure that service levels are set appropriately it is important to understand the capabilities of the people, processes, and tools that underlie them and this requires measurement up front to eliminate guess work.

Takeaways:

  • Service catalogues have a demonstrated value within enterprises to manage costs, improve service delivery, and enhance relationships
  • As important as service definition is to success, service level definition may be even more so to avoid “over-commit, under-deliver” situations
  • Without good performance metrics, the kind derived from an IT Service Optimization platform, establishing appropriate service levels is nothing more than a shot in the dark with a low probability of success
 

9:20 am - 9:45 am

Executive Exchange

 

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Think Tank

Embracing the Mobile Wallet

There has been much discussion over the last couple of years about the development and adoption of Mobile or Digital Wallets, yet the pace of development and adoption continues to be slow. As Near Field Communications (NFC) becomes more ubiquitous across mobile devices, the discussion of e-Wallet development and adoption will only increase. Will the future be client-side wallets or provider-side wallets, will it be individual wallets offered by individual retailers, or amalgamated wallets offered by consortia?

Takeaways:

  • Adoption rates are currently low with initial indications they may stay that way, with less than 40% indicating they would use an e-wallet
  • Mobile retailing is expected to eclipse $500M in just a few years however, growth that needs greater mobile wallet adoption
  • Retailers need to take a position on mobile wallets now to put themselves in a position to benefit from the growth potential

Call for Speakers

Think Tank

Making ITIL Work – Moving Beyond Frameworks and Getting to Action

In order to deal with the increasing pressure to increase service delivery, service efficiency, and service effectiveness, IT departments are adopting the ITIL framework. While ITIL adoption has lots of press around the benefits that it can deliver, it doesn’t do so without hard work, and it doesn’t do so without the tools that activate, measure, and validate adopted frameworks and processes. In order to achieve the four goals of ITIL adoption – reduced cost of operations, improved service delivery, improved user satisfaction, improved compliance – IT leaders need to be prepared to move beyond just the process and invest in the technology solutions that make them work.

Takeaways:

  • IT departments are under increasing pressure to improve effectiveness and help overcome core business challenges
  • Standardized process frameworks, such as those provided by ITIL, are a tried and true way to become more effective
  • Frameworks by themselves are about as useful as the paper they are written on and tools are required to make them work
 

9:50 am - 10:15 am

Executive Exchange

 

Thought Leadership

Public, Private, Hybrid: Understanding the Pros and Cons

When it comes to a move to the cloud, enterprises have three very distinct options available to them (or two distinct options and a third that is the blend of the first two). Public clouds offer the potential of tremendous flexibility and unparalleled efficiency but come with question marks about security and resiliency. Private clouds directly address those concerns but bring far bigger price tags, both in terms of dollar cost and management requirements. On the surface hybrid clouds seem to offer the best of both worlds by marrying the best of public and private, and minimizing their worst. But this isn’t necessarily the case and in many ways hybrid can be seen as nothing more than a compromise solution that compromises all the benefits of the cloud. The key for enterprises when selecting a cloud model is to look at the big picture and build a strategy that leverages strengths, minimizes weaknesses, and is built for the long term.

Takeaways:

  • The promise of the public cloud lies in its flexibility, cost-effectiveness and ease of use but it brings with it a loss of control
  • Private clouds all but guarantee data privacy and protection but carry significantly bigger price tags and negative impacts of accessibility
  • Hybrid clouds allow enterprises to mix and match to get the right cost vs. security balance but ratchet management complexity up to all new levels
 

10:20 am - 10:30 am

Morning Networking Coffee Break

 

10:35 am - 11:00 am

Executive Exchange

 

Executive Boardroom

Cloud Adoption Challenges on a Macro Level

The hype around the cloud is pervasive and can be potentially overwhelming but numerous studies have shown that tangible benefits can be had, whether in cost savings, efficiency improvements, or flexibility enhancements. That said numerous impediments exist to not just realizing that value, but even considering adoption; regulatory issues, integration challenges, business process revamp, and a dozen other challenges can halt cloud projects in their tracks before they get off the ground. In this group discussion we'll explore those inhibitors, understanding which challenges prevent adoption and what can be done to overcome them. 

Takeaways: 

  • The cloud presents a significant opportunity to organizations and while most have adopted in some form or other, wholesale adoption still lags 
  • To realize benefits enterprises must deal with a variety of challenges each one requiring different solutions 
  • Industry by industry adoption is constrained for different reasons but do common solutions exist that can resolve issues across the board?

Executive Boardroom

Multi-Platform Mobile Development

As enterprises take that deep dive into mobile computing, they move from simply allowing mobile devices into their environment towards leveraging those devices to fulfill roles and functions otherwise unaddressable by traditional devices. This means developing and deploying apps, but things aren’t as simple as “write once, publish many”. Leaving the issue of platform variability to the side, one of the biggest issues in app development is form factor differentiation and the clearest expression of that issue is the difference between smartphones and tablets. While Android co-founder Andy Rubin is on record as saying form factor should have no bearing, there is a strong body of evidence that says apps should be developed differently for different devices if the goal is the utmost usability and productivity. As IT leaders invest more heavily in mobile application development, this is an issue that requires significant deliberation to ensure development time and money is not squandered.

Takeaways:

  • Tablets are not simply Smartphones made bigger; they are unique devices with unique properties and unique capabilities
  • Users do not use tablets and smartphones to do the same things because they way they interact with them is different
  • Mobile development needs to determine if distinct tablet and smartphone apps are required by understanding use cases and device capabilities
 

11:05 am - 11:30 am

Executive Exchange

 

Executive Boardroom

Planning for a MultiCloud Future

The promise of the cloud is almost beyond compare; infinite computing resources, unmatched reliability and uptime, instantaneous service availability, simplistic self-service and provisioning, and the low-low prices of a “buy by the drink” model. These are the reasons behind the rush to the cloud that we are currently experiencing, but the wholesale adoption does bring a downside – as more and more capability is moved to the cloud, more and more cloud providers are utilized since, for the most part, each provider offers only a limited suite of services. The MultiCloud environment that creates a new set of challenges that IT leaders need to overcome, notably resiliency, interoperability/integration, and security and compliance through careful planning and the lessons learned from building complex on premise distributed systems.

Takeaways:

  • As enterprises move to the cloud, MultiCloud environments will increasingly become the norm, not the exception
  • Consistent planning and thoughtful architecture will be essential to efficient and effective cloud deployments
  • IT leaders do not need to be alarmed, they’ve been down the complex environment path before, but they do need to be careful

Executive Boardroom

Identity and the New Age of Enterprise Security

From a technology standpoint, as a “society” the world of business has gone through two distinct stages in the evolution of its information security focus. The first addressed network based protection and preventative controls such as firewalls and anti-malware. The second looked at data-centric and detective controls such as encryption and intrusion/extrusion monitoring. Since breaches continue to occur at a record pace, what is need new is clearly a new evolution, one that pushes towards individual focused security through granular user monitoring and management as provided by solutions such as Identity and Access Management. While IAM isn’t a new technology field, it is one whose time has come and CISO need to begin investing in modern-day, light-weight, easy to implement IAM solutions now to stay ahead of the curve, and reduce enterprise threats. 

Takeaways: 

• The breach onslaught demonstrates that existing security solutions are incapable of defending current threats 

• Enterprises need to begin looking at security from an activity perspective rather than an artifact perspective 

• IAM provides activity insight, and therefore threat awareness, no other platform can equal

 

11:35 am - 12:00 pm

Executive Exchange

 

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Think Tank

On-line and On-premise Retail Integration

Online retailers are exerting serious pressure on those with bricks and mortar stores and as a result many “traditional” retailers are heavily investing in their own online retail channels. Operating in a dual channel mode however reduces the impact and value of these initiatives as studies show that where on-line and on-premise retailing is tightly integrated, through offerings such as “Buy Online, Pickup in Store” see as much as a 4% sales uplift. To be able to provide this tight integration however retailers must ensure that they can provide real time comprehensive inventory updates, a consistent experience across both channels.

Takeaways:

  • Well integrated channels drive greater revenue as a result of higher in-store sales though at the expense of some online sales
  • In store increase come from greater opportunity for upsell / cross sell while online decreases are the result of greater cart abandonment
  • An inability to provide consistent and real-time inventory information is the single biggest impediment to channel integration

Call for Speakers

Think Tank

Disaster Recovery and Preparing for the Inevitable

Like death and taxes, IT outages are an inevitability whether as the result of power loss, telecommunications outage, or any one of a myriad other potential technical and non-technical issues. In this environment, the savvy CIO knows that what matters most is preparation – being ready for that next outage with an IT infrastructure that is both resilient and flexible and Disaster Recovery procedures that allow for efficient and effective recovery, balancing Recovery Time and Recovery Point objectives with appropriate cost. Disasters happen but with proper planning they don’t have to be disastrous to your business.

Takeaways:

  • In the event of a severe outage, businesses without a Disaster Recovery plan are at a significant disadvantage when it comes to recoverability and viability
  • DR planning cannot be an “at all costs” proposition and appropriate planning must take into account reasonable Recovery Time and Recovery Point objectives
  • Catastrophic outages get the press but are the thin end of the wedge – minor service interruptions are far more common and must be planned for as well
 

12:05 pm - 12:30 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Case Study

Implementing Business Simplification for Success and Growth

Organizational complexity is the single most significant impediment that enterprises are dealing with today; it underlies every business problem enterprises faces and undermines every effort to address them. Organizational complexity is grounded in cumbersome processes, but those poor processes exist only because enterprise applications themselves, including those that are customer facing, as well as those that are not, are complex and unwieldy. To address cultural complexity then, enterprises must eliminate the complexity in their application suite by either building new, buying new, or more efficiently simplifying what they already have. Only by simplification can enterprises eliminate complexity in an efficient and effective way and position themselves for success. 

Takeaways: 

  • Enterprises live and breath by the speed with which regular transactions occur â?" turning these into one minute transactions is the key to success
  • Complexity must be eliminated in all applications customer-facing, core internal, and internal supporting alike 
  • Building or buying new, less complex applications offers limited gains because eventually all introduce complexities of their own; only simplified applications offer long term, sustained elimination of complexity
 

12:35 pm - 1:20 pm

Networking Luncheon


 

1:25 pm - 1:50 pm

Executive Exchange

 

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Think Tank

Influencing Retail Trends Through Social Media

While “social selling” is predicted to boom, spiking from $3B to $5B is total revenue over the next couple of years, it will continue to represent just a tiny portion of the retail market as a whole. The biggest impact social has on retail is not conversion, but exposure as its real value comes from informing and influencing, so called “top of funnel” retail activities. As such, while social may not have a significant impact on top line performance for an individual retailer, its potential bottom line impact, by creating and enhancing brand and product awareness can be massive. As such, retailers that have not already done so need to begin investing in a social management capability, leveraging the available social media channels as an interactive extension of its traditional marketing and advertising capabilities.

Takeaways:

  • As consumers increasingly move online and to mobile channels the relevance and impact of social media to retail increases in lock-step
  • Of the big social media platforms, Pinterest has already eclipsed Twitter in terms of impact on retail and is rapidly catching Facebook
  • Social media allows for the creation of two-way (retailer created and consumer created) lightweight content marketing that is easier to consume in today’s attention deficit world

Call for Speakers

Think Tank

NFV and SDN – Building the Network of the Future

Cloud has changed the way we build back-end systems, mobility has changed the way we build the front end too, and now the combination of Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) and Software Defined Networking (SDN) is going to change the way we build networks. By allowing for the separation of control plane and data plane while simultaneously migrating both of those pieces to inexpensive commodity hardware we allow for the creation of more redundant, more dynamic, more efficient, and far less costly networks, eliminating a major bottle-neck to IT and service innovation. CIOs must begin investigating and implementing these technologies now to ensure they are on the leading edge of service delivery.

Takeaways:

  • The traditional way of building networks is archaic and its lifespan limited – NFV and SDN promise far greater flexibility of cost effectiveness
  • These technologies are admittedly early phase, but so were cloud and mobility when they began radically changing the technology landscape
  • Now is the time to begin to invest in pilot projects, to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to leverage the technologies as they mature
 

1:55 pm - 2:20 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Thought Leadership

Big Data, Small Data, and all the Data in Between

Increasingly over the last several years the term “Big Data” has become prevalent, to the point that it is invariably all anyone thinks of when data is mentioned at all. Often what we think of when we use the term “Big Data” is actually unstructured data – all the new data forms that enterprises have never collected before and are being overwhelmed by the possibilities of. But big/unstructured data is by no means the only data enterprises have and core structured or “small” data is often still the most relevant and valuable data an enterprise owns. As we collectively push forward into a more analytics-centric and therefore data-centric world what we need is a considered all-data strategy, one that incorporates big data, small data, master data, and meta data.

Takeaways:

  • While Big Data is valuable, so is the rest of the data that an enterprise owns and consistent focus must be applied to all data forms and types
  • A holistic data strategy that considers and the balances the needs of all data structures, types, needs, uses, and owners is essential for efficient and effective data operations
  • For business that have not yet invested in Master Data Management, such a program is the ideal foundation for building a comprehensive data program
 

2:25 pm - 2:50 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Executive Boardroom

Embrace the Cloud: Adopting a Brokerage Model

The allure of the Cloud is three-fold: the widely seen benefits are reduced cost, increased flexibility, and enhanced time to market. As a result, business are rushing to the Cloud in ever increasing droves. In many cases, however, the rush is omitting the IT department until it is too late, and the specter of incompatible data and communications standards, of an inability to integrate with existing on-premise systems hangs over these deployments. To combat these issues, IT leaders need to recognize the value provided by the Cloud and develop a brokerage model whereby IT can direct business peers to the right Cloud delivered service.

Takeaways:

  • Learn what the benefits of the cloud are, and why estimates are being missed
  • Understand the drivers of these misses and why they are a problem
  • Determine the best approach for IT to take to head those problems off while offering an even higher level of service and value

Executive Boardroom

Making Mobile Apps Enterprise Apps with Clean Integration

Application integration is a challenging task no matter what the platform being used. Finding a way to have various enterprise applications communicate and work together cleanly and efficiently requires dedication and focus. Mobile apps stand on the precipices of disrupting everything that enterprises have done so far to manage application integration by throwing new platforms, new communication methodologies, new coding languages and new APIs into the mix. As mobile apps increasingly become the primary enterprise apps as opposed to simplified extensions of existing ones, CIOs and IT departments will need to look at application integration with fresh eyes to ensure that both utmost performance and rock solid operability continues to be offered across the entire integrated application suite.

Takeaways:

  • Application integration is a complex challenge at the best of times; the introduction of an increasing number of enterprise mobile apps will only complicate things further
  • Application integration is the key to efficient application, and therefore business, operations and so cannot simply be ignored or pushed to the back burner
  • Businesses that do not tightly integrate enterprise mobile apps with core enterprise applications run significant risks
 

2:55 pm - 3:20 pm

Executive Exchange

 

Executive Boardroom

Cloud, Crowd, Content: Changing the Big Data Game

It’s no secret that Big Data is a big deal, but just how big is it? Some estimates show that while we have a massive 2 Zettabytes under collective corporate management, that this represents one ten thousandth of a percent of the data that has been created. Fortunately, those other “nexus” technologies are providing the opportunity to make use of these untapped data resources – mobile is providing a ubiquitous input channel, cloud a dynamically scalable processing capability, and social the community involvement to process and find value. Leveraged well Big Data can solve a wealth of corporate challenges, ranging from improving efficiency, through mitigating risk, to actually growing bottom line revenue.

Takeaways:

  • Understand how big Big Data really is and where the value to your organization lies
  • Learn what problems Big Data solves and how it achieves value
  • Be challenged to think about the future of Big Data in your organization

Executive Boardroom

IoT and IT/OT

One of the key areas for early IoT projects is in the area of industrial automation, as an extension of existing, older M2M type technologies. In many cases these older industrial automation initiatives used proprietary communications protocols and dedicated sensors that interfaced with controllers that could manage communications between IT and OT platforms. Fast forward to an IoT world however and these sensors and controllers will need to natively speak IP, natively integrate to back-end enterprise systems beyond just simple controllers, systems such as ERP, BI and other core platforms. Navigating the complexity of process, data, security, and functionality implications has the potential to be a minefield for the unwitting IT executive that goes in without eyes wide open.

Takeaways:

  • IT/OT integration is a low-hanging fruit area for IoT adoption
  • Existing investments into older M2M IT/OT integrations however can erode any potential value
  • Before investing in IoT enabled IT/OT integration careful consideration must be made of the implications and whether value can be realized – does the investment justify the returns over what is already in place?
 

3:25 pm - 3:35 pm

Afternoon Networking Coffee Break

 

4:10 pm - 4:35 pm

Executive Exchange

 

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Think Tank

Overcoming the Data/Privacy Divide

To drive greater focus and flexibility in retail capability, retailers are investing heavily in customer data capture and customer data analytics capabilities, whether from traditional loyalty programs, online data capture, or in-store mobile tracking. As more and more personable data is collected or created however, the specter of customer privacy issues begin to loom larger and larger. Enterprises need to take a long hard look at the information they are capturing and the manner in which it is being used to determine whether the potential value outweighs the potential risk, and whether the incentive offer to the customer is sufficient to overcome any reticence on their part.

Takeaways:

  • Data privacy is not a show-stopper; customers are willing to share personal information if the payoff is sufficiently worthwhile
  • Not all information gathering needs to be personal and in many cases anonymous aggregated data can be just as instructive, certainly about trends
  • Where information gathering does get personal, opt-in with balancing opt-back-out requirements are essential

Call for Speakers

Think Tank

Leadership Considerations in a Multi-Generational World

Executives are currently facing a difficult challenge in terms of personnel management because they are dealing with three very different generational groups of workers – Baby Boomers, Gen Xers, and Millennials. These three groups all have very different outlooks on the world and on work, and all have very different work styles and capabilities. These differences lead to lack of understanding and conflict in a lot of cases, conflict that leaders must learn how to overcome. Smart leaders know that they need to leverage the differences between generations rather than expecting, and trying to force, everyone to be the same, and that building an integrated workforce, with complimentary skills and abilities, is the key to long-term workforce stability.

Takeaways:

  • Boomers (1946 to 1964), Gen Xers (1965 to 1980), and Millennials (1981-2000) have had different life experiences which has given them different outlooks
  • Each group has specific and unique strengths that can and should be brought to bear to improve the enterprise
  • Building an integrated team that recognizes and rewards differences yields greater success than trying to homogenize everyone to the same standard
 

4:40 pm - 5:20 pm

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Executive Visions

Facilitating Technology-Enabled Business Transformation

The role of the modern CIO is more complex than it has ever been before, not just because the technology landscape has become more complex, but also because increasingly the CIO has had to become a business-focused executive, not just a technologist. Long have we talked about the CIO “getting a seat at the table” but modern businesses are now demanding that their technology impresario join them and leverage his deep and rich technical acumen to allow the organization as a whole to better position itself for market-place success. To be successful, CIOs need to invest in themselves, in their personnel, and in the right technologies to allow them to position the IT department to proactively address business needs as an innovator and driver, rather than order-taker and enabler.

Takeaways:

  • IT leadership can no longer be simply technology focused, but must instead take their visibility into business process and become business focused
  • A broader business-focus does not preclude maintaining technology excellence however and indeed may demand more of it than ever before
  • Success for CIOs will be measured not in how they can enable enterprise decisions, but in how they can drive growth

Moderated by:

James Quin, VP, Events , CDM Media View details

 
 
 

5:20 pm - 5:30 pm

Thank You Address and Closing Remarks

 

5:30 pm - 7:00 pm

Cocktail Reception